Norway & the Fjords

Prepare to be mesmerized as you set sail for Norway, a cruise destination unlike any other.

With its majestic fjords, towering mountains, and pristine wilderness, Norway is a land of breathtaking beauty and enchanting landscapes. As you navigate the deep blue waters, you’ll witness the spectacle of cascading waterfalls, encounter charming coastal villages nestled against dramatic cliffs, and witness the ethereal glow of the Northern Lights dancing across the night sky. Embrace rich Norse heritage, explore the vibrant city of Oslo, or embark on thrilling outdoor adventures such as hiking, kayaking, or whale watching. Norway’s allure lies in its perfect fusion of natural wonders and cultural treasures, promising a cruise experience that will leave you in awe of its raw and untouched magnificence.

Ports you might visit

Alesund
Alesund, Norway
Alta, Norway
Andalsnes, Norway
Bergen, Norway
Crossing the Arctic Circle
Ergersund
Ergersund, Norway
Flaam, Norway
Flam, Norway
Geirangerfjord
Hardangerfjord
Haugesund, Norway
Hellesylt, Norway
Hjørundfjord
Honningsvåg
Kalvåg, Norway
Kristiansund
Loen, Norway
Lofoten
Lustrafjorden
Lysefjord
Nordfjord
Oslofjord, Norway
Senja
Senja
Skjolden
Skjolden, Norway
Sognefjord
Sognefjord, Norway
Sognefjorden, Norway
Stavanger
Stavanger, Norway
Svolvær, Norway
Traena
Tromso, Norway
Trondheim
Vaerlandet
Alesund

Alesund

You'll have Kaiser Wilhem II to thank for this city. After all, when it was destroyed by fire in 1904, he decided to rebuild his beloved gateway in Art Nouveau style. Now its buildings dazzle with dreamy turrets and ornate carvings of dragons and mythical figures. Take the opportunity to wander Ålesund’s charming cobblestone streets and admire the numerous spires, towers and highly-ornate buildings. Nature has played its part too, as calm waters and distant snow-capped peaks add to the charm.
Alesund, Norway

Alesund, Norway

Ålesund is renowned for its beautiful art nouveau architecture. This owes to a devastating fire that burned a large part of the city to the ground in 1904. The entire town was subsequently rebuilt in the fashionable art nouveau style of the time. Take the opportunity to wander Ålesund’s charming cobblestone streets and admire the numerous spires, towers and highly-ornate buildings. Norway is a seafood nation and Ålesund is its fisheries capital. Take the opportunity to visit the Norwegian Aquarium - built directly into the rocky coastline, the aquarium is also an architectural marvel. Due to excellent oceanic conditions along the Norwegian coast, the aquarium features a colourful and exciting range of fish and fauna, including octopus, seals and penguins.
Alta, Norway

Alta, Norway

Alta lies in the vast wilderness of Troms and Finnmark county, well above the Arctic Circle at 70  degrees  north. Welcome to one of the northernmost towns in the world with a population over 10,000. The town is directly beneath the Auroral Oval, a zone known for consistent Northern Lights activity. If the heavens aren’t overcast, and the conditions are right, you might well be in for quite the show...
Andalsnes, Norway

Andalsnes, Norway

Near this idyllic town, gaze up at the "Troll Wall", whose immense grassy cliffs form the highest vertical mountain face in Europe. Or make an ascent of the "Troll Ladder", a road whose hairpin bends zig-zag up a steep mountainside and reveal spectacular valley views close to the thundering Stigfossen Waterfall.
Bergen, Norway

Bergen, Norway

Unlock this fascinating "Gateway to the Fjords", Norway's second-largest city, Bergen is home to over 200,000 people. Maritime trade and oil industry are still vital to the city's economy. Visit medieval wooden houses on the waterfront and peek inside the workshops of local painters, weavers and craftsmen where works of art - some better than others - await discovery.
Crossing the Arctic Circle

Crossing the Arctic Circle

Sail north along the rugged Helgeland coast towards Lofoten, following the sheltered coastal route that Hurtigruten pioneered almost 130 years ago. Once past Brønnøysund, the ship will soon cross the Arctic Circle. The occasion will be marked with a special ceremony. What that ceremony will be is something you’ll just have to be on board to find out! Then enter Northern Norway and, for the next few days, the warm glow of the 24-hour Midnight Sun will accompany you.
Ergersund

Ergersund

Egersund is famous for its brightly coloured, wooden houses – a real departure from the white-painted dwellings of many of Norway’s towns, and a welcome sight as you approach the harbour. It’s also one of the best natural harbours in Norway, and it used to be the largest in the country when measured in quantity of fish landed each year.  Enjoy exploring the bijoux town centre, which has preserved some of the best examples of wooden houses – a few even dating back 160 years. Explore the many beautifully decorated shops in the pedestrianised town centre, while the varied landscape surrounding the town is great for walking. 
Ergersund, Norway

Ergersund, Norway

Egersund is famous for its brightly coloured, wooden houses – a real departure from the white-painted dwellings of many of Norway’s towns, and a welcome sight as you approach the harbour. Bask in the magical atmosphere while admiring the rustic wooden houses and narrow streets of this historic town. Peruse the many beautifully decorated shops of the pedestrianised town centre. A visit to the local chocolate and ice cream factory is also well worth a visit. There are small windows inside where you can see tasty treats being prepared. Indulge in gourmet chocolate and pick from a range of ice cream flavours.
Flaam, Norway

Flaam, Norway

Calling all train lovers! Tiny Flam is renowned for the 20km stretch of railway that winds and climbs alongside spectacular Sognefjord. It's an unforgettable perspective on Europe's longest fjord as the steepest line in the world spirals its way through twisting mountains. The views are simply spellbinding.
Flam, Norway

Flam, Norway

Sailing through Norway's beautiful Sognefjord, the worlds longest and deepest fjord, is one of the most memorable cruise experiences. Overlooked by snow-capped peaks and surrounded by cascading waterfalls, this is a sensational approach to the tiny village of Flam, which nestles in the innermost part of Sognefjord.
Geirangerfjord

Geirangerfjord

The deep emerald green colour of the fjord itself and the fairytale landscape has led to Geirangerfjord often being referred to as the ‘jewel in the crown’ of the Norwegian fjords. Springtime is arguably the best season to see Geirangerfjord: there are fewer visitors; the weather will be milder; the sun may glisten on the fjord and warm your face; and the snow will have started to melt into mesmerising waterfalls. Looming above you, undaunted by the sun, will be majestic snow-capped mountain tops. Tender boats will take you ashore to further explore the special nature of the fjords and its many small communities.
Hardangerfjord

Hardangerfjord

The climate here is mild and in spring, the hillsides are blanketed in white blossoms of the prettiest apple orchards in Norway. The region is understandably famous for its apple products, from jams and juice to its award-winning cider, which one wine critic described as “Nordic champagne”.
Haugesund, Norway

Haugesund, Norway

Haugesund stands on Norway's southwest shore, where the fjords flow out into the North Sea. The breathtaking scenery and a rich Viking legacy make it an intriguing destination on cruises along the Norwegian coast.
Hellesylt, Norway

Hellesylt, Norway

Nearby Geiranger might be more widely known, but the UNESCO World Heritage listed village of Hellesylt seems determined not to be overshadowed by its more famous neighbour
Hjørundfjord

Hjørundfjord

Hjørundfjord is part of the UNESCO designated Fjords Norway area which is notable for “exceptional natural beauty”. Unlike its neighbour, the famous Geirangerfjord, which gets a bit too popular in the summer, Hjørundfjord can bask in its beauty in tranquillity thanks to being off the beaten tourist track.
Honningsvåg

Honningsvåg

Spend the morning today sailing through Arctic Norway. You’ll notice how the landscape and scenery is different from Bergen and the Helgeland Coast. The climate is usually a bit cooler too. Arriving in the small town of Honningsvåg in the late afternoon, you’ll visit one of the northernmost points in Europe as part of an included excursion. The scenic bus ride from Honningsvåg passes small bays and tiny villages, then crosses a mountain plateau before arriving at spectacular North Cape. At 71°10’21´N, it is just 2,100 kilometres away from the Geographic North Pole.
Kalvåg, Norway

Kalvåg, Norway

Kalvåg is situated far out on the coastline with the open North Sea to the west. Its name literally means ‘Frozen Bay’ in the Old Norse. Cosy-looking houses cluster together around the bay, the reflections of their lights shimmering like candles in the waters below. The wonderful wintery atmosphere is even more captivating when the village is coated with a snug blanket of snow.
Kristiansund

Kristiansund

After the past few days spent exploring tranquil and isolated coastal settings, get ready for a change of tempo today. Dock at Kristiansund which is one of the most densely populated cities in Norway. Its urban area is spread across four islands with bustling waterfronts, scenic marinas and distinctive architecture, decorated in shades of red, yellow and green. It’s a city that has made its living from the sea: fishing, shipping and oil and gas. Kristiansund is also known as Norway’s ‘Dried Cod Capital’ because of its historic export of salted fish or bacalao, known locally as klippfisk.
Loen, Norway

Loen, Norway

Enter into Nordfjord, the sixth longest fjord in Norway. This fjord was created by the Jostedalsbreen Glacier, one of the largest glaciers in Europe. Aside from breathtaking glaciers and fjords, you can discover mountains, fertile valleys and beautiful sandy beaches which offer year-round adventure like skiing, hiking, paragliding, glacier walks and even surfing! The chosen destination to explore the best of Nordfjord is Loen, at the base of the fjord and of Mount Hoven. We dock outside Loen itself, and use small boats to reach the small town. Loen’s Skylift cable car is one of the steepest in the world, climbing 1,100 metres at a gradient up to 60°.
Lofoten

Lofoten

You won’t forget your first approach to Lofoten because of the formidable wall of mountains looming on the horizon. The Lofoten Islands are world famous for their distinctive dramatic peaks, sheltered bays and untouched beaches - and this is your day to explore them. Lofoten is also known for its excellent fishing, picturesque villages and exciting year-round activities. We dock at idyllic Reine in the morning. Fishermen's huts dotting the shoreline and snowy granite peaks shooting out of the fjord make Reine one of the most frequently photographed landscapes in Norway. Keep looking skyward to catch sight of the Northern Lights.
Lustrafjorden

Lustrafjorden

The Lustrafjord is the innermost branch of the Sognefjord and is one of the most beautiful areas in Norway with its numerous mountains and glaciers. Scenic cruising includes local villages, old farms and cascading waterfalls.
Lysefjord

Lysefjord

Sail into the imposing Lysefjord towards the iconic viewpoint at Preikestolen. Lysefjord is 40 kilometres long, up to 422 metres deep and boasts some of the most striking vertical cliffs of all the Norwegian fjords. Preikestolen, also known as Pulpit Rock, is perhaps the most famous tourist attraction in Norway. As you approach Preikestolen, you may be treated to a fine view of this incredible rock formation from below. You may also see the equally renown Kjæragbolten where a giant boulder seems precariously wedged in a mountain crevasse.
Nordfjord

Nordfjord

Experience the grandeur of this memorable Norwegian highlight when sailing the world-renowned network of spectacular fjords, which have been created slowly but surely by nature over millions of years. As well as witnessing the striking and varied scenery as you approach port, there are many more ways to enjoy Nordfjord. Perhaps by biking, hiking or skiing, or even by cable car at over 1,000 metres.
Oslofjord, Norway

Oslofjord, Norway

This bustling fjord, filled with characterful islands, enjoys milder year-round temperatures than most Norway, making it a prime sport for water sports enthusiasts and outdoor hobbyists.
Senja

Senja

Dock at Senja, one of the most ruggedly beautiful and less-visited islands in Norway. You’ll be awestruck by the scenery on display. Senja is Norway’s second largest island but counts fewer than 8,000 inhabitants, most of whom are employed in fishing and aquaculture. Sometimes referred to as ‘Norway in miniature’, the island boasts diverse landscapes that seem to change in the blink of an eye. One of the best ways to see the island’s many beautiful contrasting topographies is a road trip along the National Scenic Route in Senja.
Senja

Senja

Sometimes referred to as ‘Norway in miniature’, the island boasts diverse landscapes and weather that seem to change in the blink of an eye. The wild Atlantic side boasts towering, rocky mountains that plunge into the sea, while the tranquil southern side is home to lush, green farmland.
Skjolden

Skjolden

Sognefjord is the longest and deepest of the Norwegian fjords, stretching over 200 kilometres inland from Bergen. It has many fjord tributaries, some of which themselves require a full day to explore. As you sail deeper into the fjord, head out on deck to get a sense of the scale of the fjordal landscape around you. Occasionally, we pass idyllic fjord villages nestled along the fertile plains. One of these is Skjolden, home to 200 residents. The highlight here is a trip to nearby Urnes Stave Church.
Skjolden, Norway

Skjolden, Norway

Skjolden is a serene village nestled among mountains. Arrive there via Sognefjord, the world's longest navigable fjord, putting you at the heart of Norway's majestic scenery. Skjolden itself actually sits within the Lusterfjord, an arm of the Sognefjord, and your arrival is truly mesmerising. Forested slopes lead down towards the still waters, summer meadows and fruit-bearing farmlands extend from their edge in patchworks of brilliant green, made so vibrant by the melt water of two glaciers
Sognefjord

Sognefjord

Here is your chance to experience this unique World Heritage Site, sailing the same waters of Norse and Viking legends. This is also the opportunity to explore the many natural wonders whilst ashore. Take a walking trail at your own pace, you’re never far from a memorable sight or place of interest, or choose from a selection of boat trips that take you to the islands in the fjord’s tributaries.
Sognefjord, Norway

Sognefjord, Norway

On the southern side of Sognefjord you’ll be greeted by the stunning scenery of one of the most beautiful fjords in the world. Nærøyfjord is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, selected for being “among the most scenically outstanding landscapes in the world” and “exceptional in scale and grandeur. Also visit the beautiful little glacier village of Fjærland, where the Sognefjord meets Jostedalsbreen Glacier. This quirky village, home to only 300 residents, has been named the Norwegian Book Town for its 10 second-hand bookshops.
Sognefjorden, Norway

Sognefjorden, Norway

Sognefjorden, the longest and deepest fjord in Norway. Only 300 people live in this idyllic village with its many charming old buildings and picturesque second-hand book shops. This is also the place where Sognefjorden meets Jostedalsbreen, the largest glacier on the European continent.
Stavanger

Stavanger

Stavanger is blessed with history and natural beauty. From the old port, the city radiates across a network of islands interlaced with graceful bridges. Stavanger's Romanesque cathedral and old medieval lanes blend beautifully with the modern city and spectacular countryside. Journey back in time on a tour of Utstein Cloister, a beautifully preserved Augustin Monastery from the Middle Ages.
Stavanger, Norway

Stavanger, Norway

Welcome to Stavanger – known for its many nearby natural attractions, including famous Pulpit Rock and long sandy beaches along the North Sea. The Stavanger region is on the radar of nearly every visitor to Norway. Many different nationalities are drawn to the area, making it a highly international destination. Its cosmopolitan nature is reflected in the city’s lively, urban ambience, with creative food menus, fun pubs and bars, and a booming cultural scene. While it’s less likely to spot the Northern Lights this far south, it does happen. Keep your eyes on the northern edge of the horizon.
Svolvær, Norway

Svolvær, Norway

Svolvær is the largest town in Lofoten with about 4,800 residents, many of whom work as fishermen. There are shops and art galleries to browse along the seafront promenade and rows of rorbuer to admire. You might spot wooden racks called hjell dotted around the shores of the town too. Locally caught cod is dried on these racks and later turned into tørrfisk, or stockfish in English, and prized as a local delicacy. Fishing is clearly an important way of life in Lofoten and the lectures for the day may focus on how cod effectively helped to build Norway into a country.
Traena

Traena

Træna is an archipelago of over 400 islands and islets right on the Arctic Circle. Go on a scenic walk around the village of Husøya where most of Træna’s 454 inhabitants live. Surprisingly, the community on the islands has a Nordic-Hawaiian vibe, which is probably best appreciated in summer. There is a permanent outdoor photography exhibition, a themed café, and even a local ‘Waikiki Beach’.
Tromso, Norway

Tromso, Norway

At Tromso, you’re nearly 250 miles inside the Arctic Circle and one of the best places to see the Northern Lights. Clues to your location are everywhere; the bars are fully stocked with Arctic Beer and the Arctic Cathedral resembles a geometric glacier. Home to over 100 nationalities, the city offers a wealth of eateries serving the best native cuisine in the Arctic. Tromso features the Polaria Arctic Centre, where the exhibits recreate a polar bear den and an Arctic snowstorm. You might experience them for real from the cable cars that climb Mount Storsteinen.
Trondheim

Trondheim

Explore regal pomp and ceremony, Norwegian style. The wooden "Stiftsgarden" is the city's official royal residence and under Nidaros Cathedral's gleaming spire, monarchs are still crowned to this day. You can also ride the quaint sightseeing streetcar and or make interesting visits to open-air folk museums, a working ski jump and the Lokken Copper Mines.
Vaerlandet

Vaerlandet

Explore the area around Værlandet, the westernmost islands of Norway, and the outlet of Sognefjord. At only 3.5 square miles and with only 200 people, Værlandet itself is a small island even by Norwegian standards and the island is rarely visited by cruise ships. The windswept islands in and around Værlandet face the North Sea and are a stark contrast to the sheltered fjords. Here, where even the trees are small and bent by the wind, small communities exist, surviving largely on fishing and a little tourism. The coastal islands are also home to many animals, so be on the lookout for seals, otters, porpoises, eagles and deer.