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Dubai, Arabian Gulf & India

Cruise Dubai, Arabian Gulf & India

Rising from Arabia’s desert sand, the cities of the Middle East gleam in the hot sun, towering testaments to the ingenuity of the designers and builders of the vast skyscrapers that mark the horizon.

Through the ages the humble pearl-fishing village on the Persian Gulf has transformed into modern Dubai, with its soaring glass skyscrapers and rich cultural heritage. Close to Aqaba, your emergence from the gorge that leads into the ancient rose-red city of Petra, many of its buildings carved into the solid cliff face, is a moment you’ll always remember. That may also be true of an ascent of Dubai’s ultra modern Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building. You could follow the Frankincense trail in Oman.

Time has changed much of the world with technology and cyber trade, but you can still find markets where silks, sandalwood and spices are traded in colourful Mumbai and Cochin. At Agra, the timeless Taj Mahal returns your gaze across a tranquil pool, its reflection changed only by the passage of the sun.

Upcoming Cruises

Ports you might visit

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Aqaba and Petra
Cairo (Port Said), Egypt
Dubai
Khasab, Oman
Khor al Fakkan
Manama, Bahrain
Muscat, Oman
Salalah
Sir Bani Yas Island, UAE
Suez, Egypt
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

This modern island city reflects the opulence of the seven wealthy United Arab Emirates of which it is capital. Discover duty-free shopping in countless grand malls or stroll along the seafront Corniche. Gaze at the white domes of the vast Sheikh Zayed Mosque or escape into the desert for a Bedouin feast or a ride across the dunes.
Aqaba and Petra

Aqaba and Petra

Travel to the astonishing hidden city of Petra, Jordan, looming like a mirage that melts into the red sandstone hills of the desert. Dating back to 7,000 B, Petra was the capital of a flourishing civilisation that stretched from the Mediterranean to the Red Sea. Aqaba offers internationally renowned diving and the richest marine life in the entire Red Sea.
Cairo (Port Said), Egypt

Cairo (Port Said), Egypt

The exhilarating exploration of Egypt begins at Port Said on Egypt’s Mediterranean coast where you will see the iconic landmark lighthouse before heading to the spectacular and instantly recognisable Pyramids at Giza together with the sphinx – the world’s oldest known statue and an enduring emblem of Egypt. Witness the impressive sight of an abundance of ships waiting to enter the Suez Canal as you cruise lazily along the fabled Nile. Visit the fascinating National Museum to investigate the dazzling collection of archaeological, prehistoric, and pharaonic pieces. A walk-through Cairo’s exotic Khan el-Khalili bazaar is more than just a shopping trip— it’s a journey back in time.
Dubai

Dubai

With so many countries, three continents and thousands of years of history on the itinerary of our Mediterranean cruises, there are plenty of ways to discover this ancient sea. You can step into grand cities and laid-back harbours, discover lively resorts and sleepy islands, stand before vibrant modern architecture or age-old wonders. Your cruise to the Mediterranean may be a sophisticated jaunt to French Riviera and Italy’s Renaissance treasures. It may follow the fairytale Adriatic to Croatian gems and magical Venice. You could weave among Greek Islands filled with white-washed villages or even reach the imperial splendor of the Black Sea.
Khasab, Oman

Khasab, Oman

Khasab is the capital of Oman's stunning Musandam peninsula, which is isolated from the majority of the country by the neighbouring United Arab Emirates. Sometimes dubbed the 'Norway of Arabia' due to its fjord-like craggy inlets and mountain-lined coast, the region's terrain is dramatic and beautiful.
Khor al Fakkan

Khor al Fakkan

Surrounded by the Hajar Mountains and flanked by pristine white-sand beaches is Khor Al Fakkan (meaning Creek of Two Jaws) on the Gulf of Oman. The town's laid-back vibe offers more in the way of relaxation than excitement and bustle. The Corniche with its palm trees, gardens, restaurants and cafés makes a pleasant stroll.
Manama, Bahrain

Manama, Bahrain

It might be one of the smallest countries in Asia, but Bahrain is packed with things to do. If you're keen to learn about the island nation's past, a visit to the Bahrain National Museum in the capital Manama is essential. Its intriguing exhibits are housed in an equally fascinating postmodern building, which seems to draw the water of the Persian Gulf right up to its windows.
Muscat, Oman

Muscat, Oman

In this low-rise gem, wedged between Arabian Gulf and scenic mountains, your first impression will be of the Sultanate of Oman's beautiful main palace. Three forts Mutrah, Jalali and Mirani stand guard at the entrance of Muscat. Once ashore witness lavish palaces, Zawawi Mosque, its pink marble crowned by a gilded dome, and Muttrah Souq, a jumble of crafts and clothing perfumed with spices and frankincense.
Salalah

Salalah

Salalah is the largest city in the Sultanate of Oman, and its the birthplace of the Sultan Qaboos bin Said. Beyond the unique atmosphere the khareef provides, there is much more to see and experience. As well as its lush green pastures, Salalah is renowned for its stunning collection of beaches, which feel almost Caribbean with their coconut trees and relaxed vibe. Try Al Mughsail Beach, a quiet and wild-feeling stretch of sand, full of caves and blowholes. For a taste of Salalah’s history, head to the Museum of the Frankinscence Land. This ancient set of ruins actually belong to the trading port of Zafar, and from here frankinscence was shipped to India, in return for spices. The on-site museum documents the history of the port as well as the area’s settlement since 2000 BC. It not only demonstrates the maritime strength of Oman, but also the modern rejuvenation of Salalah as a commercial and leisure port. 186 miles of walkways and beautiful lights at night ensure this is an unforgettable visit. During your Salalah cruise, make sure you visit one of the many markets and bazaars if possible. Al-Husn Souq is one of the best, and where the local Dhofari people come to shop. Take your pick from cotton headdresses, jewellery and heady incense. Another famous feature of Salalah is its plantations. Papayas, coconuts and small bananas all grow here and are an important part of both Salalah’s past and its future. You can walk along the plantation roads, which are just over a mile from the centre of the main town. There are plenty of fruit stands selling refreshments if you get tired. If you find yourself peckish in Salalah, there are plenty of places to pick up some traditional Omani cuisine. It is also worth keeping in mind that special dishes are cooked for two main religious festivals: Eid Al Fitr and Eid Al Adha. Discovering the khareef on your Salalah cruise Khareef is a colloquial term used for the period of time between June and September when an unusual weather phenomenon occurs in Salalah: a monsoon, caused by surface wind, rages on and causes the landscape to explode into lush green vegetation. Salalah depends on the khareef each year for its water supply, and an annual festival is held to celebrate it, which attracts tourists and locals alike every single year. The water from the monsoon transforms the landscape into a verdant and subtropical wonderland, the likes of which cannot be seen anywhere else in Oman. It also makes the ground incredibly fertile, and is the reason why this region is able to grow a wide range of fruit and vegetables such as coconuts and bananas. The city has a large expatriate community of people from India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan and Bangladesh. The majority of the population in Salalah is Muslim, and Arabic is the official language spoken here. Apart from the khareef, the climate here is fairly stable and consistently hot.
Sir Bani Yas Island, UAE

Sir Bani Yas Island, UAE

Step off your ship and onto an island oasis. Although it's actually the crest of a salt dome created millions of years ago, Sir Bani Yas has been transformed over the past four decades. Half of the 34 square-mile surface area is now covered by the Arabian Wildlife Park, a nature reserve home to lush vegetation and 13,000 animals indigenous to the Arabian Peninsula.
Suez, Egypt

Suez, Egypt

Take in the impressive sight of vast ships waiting to enter the Suez Canal at the southern entrance on the Red Sea. Suez is an embarkation / disembarkation point for those visiting Egypt's historical wonders.