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Central America & Panama Canal

Cruise Central America and Panama Canal

Central America leaves a lasting impression, with its modern resorts, rich rainforest and a fascinating Mayan legacy.  Latin America is filled with mystique and dramatic landscapes. You can encounter steaming rainforest and sparse desert, towering mountains and creaking glaciers. Bustling cities sprawl outwards or rise majestically upwards. From whale watching on Mexico’s Pacific side through Guatemala, Panama and Costa Rica to the jungles of Belize on the Caribbean Sea, every stop is an explorer’s paradise.

An iconic travel experience is a transit of the twisting waterways and mighty locks of the Panama Canal. If you are interested in maritime engineering or iconic journeys, this should be high up your list of must-sails. This legendary canal is steeped with intrigue and blessed with ever-changing scenery.

Upcoming Cruises

Ports you might visit

Arica, Chile
Belize City, Belize
Cabo San Lucas, Mexico
Coquimbo, Chile
Costa Maya, Mexico
Huatulco
Panama Canal
Praia de Vitoria, The Azores
Puerto Limon
Puerto Madryn, Argentina
Puerto Montt, Chile
Puerto Quetzal, Guatemala
Arica, Chile

Arica, Chile

Arica is a port in northern Chile, only around 12 miles or so from the border with Peru. It is a city dominated by the Morro Arica hill, and fringed with beaches loved by surfers. Nearby desert and lush valleys, a year-round mild climate and the oldest mummies on earth all add to the appeal.You cannot miss the Morro de Arica, a hulking 430-feet-high rock that looms up within the city. Chilean forces seized it from Peru in 1880 in the War of the Pacific, and the Museo Histrico y de Armas, or war museum, tells a little of the story. Standing on the top of the rock is a 36-feet-high statue of Christ of Peace, his arms outstretched, and an emblem of the city.
Belize City, Belize

Belize City, Belize

Belize is found in Central America, with Mexico to the north, Guatemala to the south and west and the Caribbean Sea to the east. Its impressive biodiversity and distinctive ecosystems translates into stunning scenery for visitors. And even with the lowest population density in Central America, Belize combines many languages and cultures, including a chance to glimpse back into the sophisticated Mayan civilisation.
Cabo San Lucas, Mexico

Cabo San Lucas, Mexico

While growing as a popular tourist destination, Cabo still retains an uncrowded feel with warm hospitality to match the sunshine. Nestled on the Southern tip of Mexico's Baja California Peninsula, it is famous for its casual atmosphere, exciting nightlife and stunning beaches and scenery.
Coquimbo, Chile

Coquimbo, Chile

Coquimbo stands on Chile's long coast, around 190 miles north of Valparaiso and Santiago. A jumble of colourful houses on a rocky peninsula, it was established as a port to serve La Serena, and became the main exportation point of copper during the nineteenth century. It still serves La Serena today, as many visitors make the trip to appreciate charming colonial architecture and beautiful beaches.
Costa Maya, Mexico

Costa Maya, Mexico

Costa Maya, located on a peninsula along Mexico's Caribbean coast about 100 miles south of Playa del Carmen, is actually a purpose-built port opened at the turn of the millennium. A convenient stop-off for cruise ships, it opens the door to Mahahual right next door, as well as several ancient Mayan sites.
Huatulco

Huatulco

Beach-lovers are spoilt for choice at Mexico's first eco-tourism resort and new cruise port, Huatulco, for there are 22 miles of pristine sand stretched across nine sparkling bays, each hidden from the other. Even within these, there are secret coves and hidden lagoons to discover.On the Mexican Riviera coast, southeast of Acapulco and where the foothills of the Sierra Madre meet the Pacific Ocean, Huatulco is in the state of Oaxaca, an area of great natural beauty three-quarters of which has been designated as ecological preservation areas by the Mexican Government.Once a small fishing village, Huatulco has been developed out of the surrounding jungle and now offers visitors a range of amenities from shops and restaurants to golf and every kind of watersport. Look out for the galleries and shops featuring handmade Oaxacan arts and crafts they make delightful gifts.
Panama Canal

Panama Canal

Everyone should sail through the Panama Canal at least once. It is a remarkable experience and a moving one when you know the mixture of tragedy and triumph, French farce and financial meltdown which went into its building. The French spent 20 fruitless years trying to build a canal - Suez-style - straight through the land. Then the Americans tried a lock-based canal and, between 1903 and 1914, completed the waterway that stands today. Look out for memorial plaques to the thousands who died in its creation, mainly of diseases rife in the forests and swamps through which the canal was forged. It is 50 miles long and, from the Caribbean side, your ship will be lifted 85ft by the Gatun Locks into Gatun Lake. She then negotiates the narrow Gaillard Cut to the Pedro Miguel and Miraflores locks which lower her back down to the level of the Pacific, which you first see stretching out on the other side of the towering Bridge of the Americas.
Praia de Vitoria, The Azores

Praia de Vitoria, The Azores

Around 840 miles west of Portugal, the Azores are a group of nine Portuguese-speaking islands scattered across the Atlantic. Praia de Vitoria is located on Terceira, an island whose name means third' in reference to the order in which it was discovered.
Puerto Limon

Puerto Limon

Setting foot on the ‘Rich Coast' at Puerto Limon, you will instantly understand how its name came about. Stroll the city's palm-lined promenade and verdant Parque Vargas for a sense of its splendour. Beyond the opulence and beauty of the port lies another kind of wealth: a dense rainforest awash with life, where an aerial tram ride at Braulio Carillo National Park carries you through the canopy.
Puerto Madryn, Argentina

Puerto Madryn, Argentina

Puerto Madryn sits on the shores of Golfo Nuevo, in Argentina, and is an attractive little town where British immigrants founded a colony in 1880. Welsh immigrants established the small town of Trelew nearby and populated the area's verdant Chubut River Valley.
Puerto Montt, Chile

Puerto Montt, Chile

Despite a population of more than 130,000, Puerto Montt retains the feel of a small town. For a simple introduction to the city, walk along the waterfront road to the fishing port of Angelmo, discovering its shore lined with tempting artisan's stalls and a collection of small cafes. Accessible from the seaport town of Puerto Montt, Chile's Lake District is an enchanted realm of emerald waterways and snow-capped volcanoes.
Puerto Quetzal, Guatemala

Puerto Quetzal, Guatemala

On the Pacific Coast of one of the worlds newest and most exciting eco-tourism and cruise destinations - Guatemala, the Central American cruise port Quetzal leads you into a country boasting sublime scenic drama and a colourful history going way back to Mayan times.