Australia

Australia promises to ignite your sense of wonder.

Explore the diverse wonders of the Great Barrier Reef, where vibrant coral reefs and marine life await your discovery. Immerse yourself in the cosmopolitan charm of Sydney with its iconic Opera House and stunning harbour. Venture into the untamed wilderness, where towering gorges and cascading waterfalls captivate the senses. Delve into the rich Aboriginal culture, and witness ancient rock art that tells stories of the land’s deep heritage. From the stunning beaches of the Whitsundays to the vibrant cityscapes of Melbourne and Brisbane, Australia offers a tapestry of experiences that will leave you enchanted. 

Prepare to be captivated by Australia’s beauty, diversity, and warm hospitality on an incredible cruise journey.

Ports you might visit

Adelaide
Airlie Beach
Akaroa
Alotau, Papua New Guinea
Apia
Auckland
Bay of Islands
Bitung
Bora Bora
Brisbane
Burnie
Busselton
Cairns
Christchurch (tours from Akaroa)
Christchurch (tours from Lyttelton)
Darwin
Dunedin
Fiordland National Park
Fremantle
Hobart
Kangaroo Island
Margaret River
Melbourne
Milford Sound
Moorea
Napier
Newcastle
Nuku’Alofa
Papeete
Perth
Port Arthur
Rabaul
Suva
Sydney
Tauranga
Wellington
Whitsunday Island
Yorkeys Knob
Adelaide

Adelaide

Connoisseurs of New World wines are in luck. With around 200 wineries a stone’s throw from the city, Adelaide is one of Australia’s best kept secrets. A charming city fringed by scenic countryside and sandy beaches, with a fantastic food market, captivating art scene, and plenty of options for sighting native Australian wildlife. One of Australia’s best-kept secrets, Adelaide is a beautiful, well-planned city nestled between fine sand beaches and hillside villages. Ringed by sweeping foothills, the city is one of culture and sophistication with a surprisingly European feel. A thriving art, theatre and food scene is giving Adelaide renewed kudos while annual events, like Adelaide Fringe, attract world-class entertainers to the city.
Airlie Beach

Airlie Beach

Australia cruises showcase rainforests in the north and stunning beaches and cosmopolitan cities in the south, which give way to a vast interior and huge ranches. New Zealand boasts towering mountains and verdant valleys, washed by tumbling waterfalls. Certain cruises extend out into the sparkling Pacific to reveal idyllic South Seas islands.
Akaroa

Akaroa

Akaroa, meaning long harbour in Maori, certainly lives up to its name. Set on a beautiful, sheltered harbour, Akaroa is now a popular resort. Seek out the best spots for dolphin watching with tours from the harbour or relax on land at one of the welcoming bars or restaurants. Alternatively take a tour to Christchurch.
Alotau, Papua New Guinea

Alotau, Papua New Guinea

Australia cruises showcase rainforests in the north and stunning beaches and cosmopolitan cities in the south, which give way to a vast interior and huge ranches. New Zealand boasts towering mountains and verdant valleys, washed by tumbling waterfalls. Certain cruises extend out into the sparkling Pacific to reveal idyllic South Seas islands.
Apia

Apia

Apia is the capital of Samoa, located on the northern coast of Upolu Island. It is the nation's major port and only city. Discover the delights of this island, its lush interiors, beautiful beaches, waterfalls and friendly locals.
Auckland

Auckland

In a nation where stunning scenery is taken for granted, this water wonderland sparkles like a freshly polished jewel. Over 48 extinct volcanoes cloaked in wild mountainous scenery encircle the City of Sails. An undulating succession of bays and inlets stretch along its endless shores. Even the downtown area with its expansive, farm-like parks exudes a sense of spacious beauty.
Bay of Islands

Bay of Islands

North of Auckland along the narrow Northland peninsula lies the shady cathedral۝ created by some of the largest trees in the world: the giant kauri trees which can stand up to 170 feet tall and are over 1,200 years old. Here the captivating Bay of Islands shelters 150 islands, enchanting wetlands of birdlife, fish, seals, dolphins and even whales.
Bitung

Bitung

Australia cruises showcase rainforests in the north and stunning beaches and cosmopolitan cities in the south, which give way to a vast interior and huge ranches. New Zealand boasts towering mountains and verdant valleys, washed by tumbling waterfalls. Certain cruises extend out into the sparkling Pacific to reveal idyllic South Seas islands.
Bora Bora

Bora Bora

Prepare for a breathtaking vision of South Pacific beauty. The dark green silhouette of Mount Otemanu presides proudly over flawless beaches, all set in a lagoon swirled with luminous shades of green and blue. Stand in crystalline waters where graceful manta rays flock, or browse local stores for the region's famed black pearls.
Brisbane

Brisbane

The Brisbane River meanders through the heart of the city. Elegant Georgian buildings of native sandstone stand next to sleek glass towers. Brisbane is also a superbly landscaped city with jacarandas, flame trees, and bougainvilleas thriving in its semi-tropical climate. Come face to face with koalas, kangaroos and wombats on tours from this laid-back city.
Burnie

Burnie

Sitting on a beautiful stretch of Tasmania's North West Coast, port city Burnie may have industrial roots, but it has since reinvented itself as a creative enclave and the state's fourth largest city. With about 40 per cent of Tasmania designated as a World Heritage Area of national parks and reserves, you can enjoy a wide range of wilderness experiences available from this laid-back market town.
Busselton

Busselton

Long beaches and rocky outcrops define the shore, while venturing inland reveals over 100 premium wineries. The area is also known for its dramatic limestone caves whose incredible formations are tied to Aboriginal mythology. Margaret River is a beautiful natural setting in Australia’s southwest corner. Busselton has grown into one of Western Australia’s most popular tourist destinations. Circled by swathes of wetlands and bordered by tranquil Geographe Bay, where scores of humpbacks and blue whales seek respite on their migrations, Busselton’s white beaches and calm blue waters offer visitors unparalleled swimming. Rocky outcrops and tall forests rise from the water’s edge, while great granite buttresses shield the beaches from the Indian Ocean’s swell. In the heart of the town, Busselton’s beloved jetty stretches out over the turquoise surf, its observatory offering breath-taking views of the reef below.
Cairns

Cairns

Laid-back Cairns is your gateway to the World Heritage-listed Great Barrier Reef, a spectacular location for snorkelling and diving among kaleidoscopic marine life and coral. Follow Foreshore Promenade around the lagoon filled with pleasure craft or take a scenic railway ride to the tranquil mountain village of Kuranda.
Christchurch (tours from Akaroa)

Christchurch (tours from Akaroa)

Akaroa means ‘long harbour’ in Maori, and the town certainly lives up to its name. Overlooked by a dormant volcano on its thin peninsula, the sheltered Akaroa is a popular resort with stunning views. Akaroa harbour provides boat tours that feature the South Island’s diminutive dolphins – and the town has several welcoming bars or restaurants. Christchurch is 52 miles away by road.
Christchurch (tours from Lyttelton)

Christchurch (tours from Lyttelton)

Nestling on the lower slopes of a steep sided extinct volcano, the historic port town of Lyttelton is overflowing with trendy cafés and quirky shops. It’s also the gateway to nearby Christchurch.
Darwin

Darwin

On the remote northern shores of Australia's Top End', balmy Darwin has grown from frontier settlement into a multicultural modern city. Discover the region's dramatic history from Aboriginal heritage to World War II air raids and the devastating Cyclone Tracey in the museums and galleries.
Dunedin

Dunedin

Dunedin is the second-largest city in the South of New Zealand and the principal of the region of Otago. In 1865 it became one of the largest cities for the influx of new settlers from Ireland, Italy, France, Germany and China due to the discovery of Gold. Sites not to be missed are the outstanding Dunedin Railway Station and a ride on the world famous Taieri Gorge Train.
Fiordland National Park

Fiordland National Park

As you sail through parts of Fiordland National Park, you will appreciate how it has mesmerised and intrigued travellers and tourists over the centuries, with its graceful and mostly untouched beauty. Amongst and beyond the glacier-carved fjords of Doubtful and Milford Sound, stand impressive snow-capped peaks, luscious green slopes and forests that are home to unusual and unique species.
Fremantle

Fremantle

Short overview here about Fremantle.
Hobart

Hobart

Wave goodbye to any preconceptions you may have of Australia, as you say hello to wonderful Hobart on the southeastern coast of Tasmania. Revel in the capital's splendid heritage, scenery and culture. Hobart has a distinctly European look and feel, and a unique local character. Capital of Australia’s Island State, with Mt. Wellington as its backdrop, it has plenty to offer the adventurous and the inquisitive.
Kangaroo Island

Kangaroo Island

There's far more than simply Kangaroos waiting to welcome you onto the rustically beautiful Kangaroo Island. The third largest Australian island boasts incredible natural beauty, unspoiled beaches and a truly unique opportunity to see an amazing range of animals in their local habitat. As you would expect there is a healthy kangaroo population, along with wallabies, koalas, seals, sea lions, and goannas, a type of lizard that grows up to a metre long.
Margaret River

Margaret River

Margaret River is a beautiful natural setting in Australia’s southwest corner that has inspired many artists here over the years. Or perhaps they just came for the seemingly endless fertile vineyards. Long beaches and rocky outcrops define Margaret River’s shores, while over 100 premium wineries lie inland. Don’t miss the dramatic limestone caves that link to Aboriginal mythology.
Melbourne

Melbourne

Originally part of New South Wales, Victoria became a colony in its own right in 1851. The discovery of gold and the development of agriculture propelled Melbourne’s rise to prominence and prosperity. Melbourne is a green and welcoming city, teeming with cultural institutions as well as cafés, bars and restaurants serving a spectrum of international cuisine. Melbourne is also an event city, home to the Australian Open Tennis, the Melbourne Cup and numerous other sporting occasions. Anyone who gets to know the city finds it has a kaleidoscopic character. Signs of Melbourne’s heritage are everywhere, and yet the city bears the glass and steel hallmarks of a modern metropolis. A visit here guarantees myriad experiences, most within easy walking range, and others a short ride aboard one of the historic trams that criss-cross the city.
Milford Sound

Milford Sound

Spectacular scenery awaits as you cruise by Milford Sound in the south-west tip of New Zealand.
Moorea

Moorea

French Polynesia is made up of some 118 islands, of which Tahiti is the best known. Just 12 miles across the lagoon from Tahiti lies Moorea, the former haunt of Tahitian nobility. Many believe this stunning island to be the inspiration for James Michener's mythical island of Bali Hai - and it's easy to see why. Picture-postcard lagoons are framed by white sand beaches and six verdant mountains that loom over the island.
Napier

Napier

Napier is New Zealand's art deco city. Following a massive earthquake in 1931, large swathes were reconstructed in the flamboyant style of the day with a superb collection of Deco, Spanish mission, and classical Revival buildings.
Newcastle

Newcastle

Newcastle is the second oldest city in Australia and welcomes you with a wonderfully relaxed atmosphere, providing the incredible beaches and surfing culture that Australia is famous for. Primarily known in the past for its coal exportation this reputation is now being quickly overtaken by its eclectic and pioneering arts scene.
Nuku’Alofa

Nuku’Alofa

In nearly 250 years since Captain Cook named then the Friendly Islands, little has changed. It remains the last kingdom in the South Pacific, colourful coral gardens are still untouched and the pleasure of sipping cool coconut milk fresh from the shell is as strong as it ever was.
Papeete

Papeete

Discover Papeete, a bustling place by South Pacific standards. With its white sands and aquamarine lagoons, this Polynesian Eden holds much the same allure today that it had in the past. Visit the museum of one of Tahiti's most famous expatriates, painter Paul Gauguin.
Perth

Perth

Perth’s explosive growth in recent decades has engulfed the old historic port of Fremantle. Eighty-percent of Western Australia’s population lives in and around Perth. This bustling port, known as “Freo” to the locals, sits on the Indian Ocean and offers a romantic, artsy ambiance to residents and visitors alike. The city’s urban sprawl is awash with fusion flavours, fashionable boutiques and innovative museums but Western Australia’s capital impresses in other ways too. Perth is famously isolated; a cosmopolitan drop in the ocean that is Australia’s outback. Stroll along the banks of the Swan River where you’ll find countless spots to sit and watch kayakers paddle by.
Port Arthur

Port Arthur

No call at Port Arthur is complete without visiting its once-feared and ever-infamous prison colony, a UNESCO historical site. Explore the fascinating ruins, once booming dockyard and restored houses.
Rabaul

Rabaul

Rabaul means mangrove'. The Germans built Rabaul on a mangrove swamp when New Britain was a German colony. Papua New Guinea showcases extraordinary wildernesses, a land of tiny tree kangaroos and giant butterflies.
Suva

Suva

It may be Fiji’s capital with 85,000 inhabitants, but Suva’s laid-back atmosphere, spectacular scenery and village-style hospitality is something of an antidote to the typical perception of city life. What’s more, it may be on Fiji’s famed coast, but it’s not a beach resort. Suva is lined by mangroves, giving it a lush backdrop. The closest beach is 25 miles away, but there’s plenty to enjoy here. A city of some 85,000 residents, the harbour town of Suva is perched on a peninsula that juts out from the coast of Viti Levu, the most populated of Fiji’s 332 islands. When Suva was established, it covered just one square mile, and in 1952 it was expanded to reach eight square miles. In this same year, Suva became Fiji’s first official city. Most of Suva’s residents are indigenous Fijians and Indo-Fijians, but there are many minority cultures in the city, which gives it a multicultural feel. Visitors to Suva are welcomed heartily by Fijians, who are known for their friendly hospitality. Wandering around Suva’s streets reveals an intriguing blend of colonial and modern architecture, painting a picture of the city’s history. Government House was once the home of Fiji’s colonial governors, but it is now the Presidential palace. Built in 1882, the building was destroyed by lightning in 1921 and was rebuilt seven years later. Although the public cannot see inside the palace, you may be lucky enough to catch the monthly changing of the guard ceremony, featuring vividly coloured uniforms. For a glimpse of traditional Fijian culture, Suva cruise passengers should pay a visit to The Fiji Museum in Thurston Gardens. One of the city’s 78 green spaces, this garden was opened in the early 20th century and boasts colourful plants and flowers, as well as the city’s museum. It is here that you can examine the largest Fijian artefact collection in the world, with some items dating back as far as 3,700 years. There are plenty of shopping options in vibrant Suva where you can find gifts and souvenirs to remind you of your trip. Cumming Street and Victoria Parade are known for their modern shops and malls, where duty-free bargains can often be discovered. For a shopping trip with a little more local flavour, try one of Suva’s lively markets, such as the Suva Municipal Market. Overflowing with fresh produce, clothing and handicrafts, residents and tourists alike can be found scouring the colourful marketplace for treasures. To slow down the pace, enjoy a walk along Queen Elizabeth Drive, which lines the city’s shoreline. Venturing a little way out of the city will take you to natural attractions such as Colo-i- Suva Forest Park, which is known for its waterfalls, natural rock pools and tranquil rainforest walks. The tropical climate means that temperatures in Suva remain constant throughout the year, with an average low of 22°C and average highs of 28°C. There is not really a dry season here, so it is best to pack some light, waterproof clothing to be prepared for rain and humidity.
Sydney

Sydney

Australia’s oldest and largest city was born in 1788 with the arrival of the "First Fleet" that transported 760 British convicts. Gold and sheep breeding propelled Sydney’s development; today it is the largest port in the entire South Pacific. Mark Twain called it “the wonder of the world”. James Michener wrote, “It is a thing of beauty, a fairy-tale body of water”.
Tauranga

Tauranga

Australia cruises showcase rainforests in the north and stunning beaches and cosmopolitan cities in the south, which give way to a vast interior and huge ranches. New Zealand boasts towering mountains and verdant valleys, washed by tumbling waterfalls. Certain cruises extend out into the sparkling Pacific to reveal idyllic South Seas islands.
Wellington

Wellington

New Zealand's capital and cruise port Wellington, is blessed with a wonderful setting, overlooking a glittering harbour filled with bobbing sailing boats. Behind the gleaming modern skyscrapers of its centre, you will find the city's history well preserved in some outstanding old buildings. Visit the second-largest wooden building in the world, the old Government Building which was built in 1876. To see New Zealand's story brought most vividly to life, visit the Te Papa Museum, a multi-level extravaganza of hands-on learning where you can explore a Maori meeting house, take a virtual reality bungee jump or even experience an earthquake.
Whitsunday Island

Whitsunday Island

Sandwiched between the coast of Queensland and the Great Barrier Reef, the Whitsunday’s beaches rank among the best in the world. In Airlie Beach itself, you’ll find a laid-back coastal town with surf boutiques, charming souvenir markets and inviting bistros serving a plethora of seafood.
Yorkeys Knob

Yorkeys Knob

With such a wonderfully evocative name, it's little wonder to find a connection with Yorkshire; that capital of eccentric place names. Yorkeys Knob sits on a headland north of Cairns, in an area of stunning natural beauty, situated as it is on the glorious Half Moon Bay and within touching distance of the Great Barrier Reef.